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20121202
20121210
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KQED (PBS) 2
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
and dreams. >> a long road he admits where success is built one small stretch at a time. for religion and ethnics newsweekly, this is sam lazaro in hate hety. . >>> we talked this week to one of the most prominent leaders of the evangelical christian right. he's richard land, president of the southern baptist convention's ethics and religious liberty commission. land plans to retire from the commission next october after 25 years as an outspoken leader in the culture wars. many observers have seen in recent polls and in last month's election returns evidence of a decline in the influence of evangelical conservatives. a setback for the causes land has led. he concedes no such thing. >> i think it's not a fair reading. for instance, on the pro-life issue, a majority of americans now say that they are pro-life. >> iñr thought that legal abortn in almost all cases is favored? >> the question about whether it should be legal in most cases is a diffent question, and the percentage who would make it illegal in most cases is actually going up. when you begin to peel "the onion," you reason t
of these things being suppressed by the courts who are now saying if there is an identification of religion in any way, then that is unconstitutional and it is a violation of the first amendment. but the interesting thing about this is that the first amendment has the establishment clause and it says that there is no way that you can interrupt the establishment of a religion or prohibited free exercise of religion. it doesn't give you freedom from religion. and that's what my objection is. these cases are being thrown out now more than they ever have been. >> bill: freedom of speech issue in many areas like the charlie brown thing where the arkansas church awas attacked for putting on a play called merry christmas charlie brown. i didn't know this did you know charlie brown was a rabbi? >> where did you get that from? >> bill: i just made it up because this is so absurd that that would be the only reason that you would have to ban because then charlie brown would be a religious figure. >> the united states supreme court would say that's not the establishment of a particular religion. all i know is
religion. if you are not in that religion or you are and you don't want to follow it can you not live the life the way you want. it is very serious. the constitution he is proposing will look like iran's constitution if it is passed and the real power resides in the religious dictates issued by 9 head of the islamic religion in the country. >>shepard: the moderates have walked out of the discussions and saying we will railroad this through. >>judge napolitano: there will be more riots because i think the judges will invalidate it. >>shepard: they have been through a lot. new trouble with millions of pounds of explosives in the recommend life home of a fictional town from "true blood" setting for a fictional vampire show with a very real crisis on their hands. [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. i just finished a bowl of your new light chicken pot pie soup and it's so rich and creamy... is it really 100 calories? let me put you on webcan... ...lean roasted chicken... and a creamy broth mmm i can still see you. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. gives you a low $18.50
. "u.s. news and world report," religion editor. your book to your credit. >> my first book. >> and still working at "u.s. news & world report." >> i still am. >> if i mention the name funk to you, who is he, robert funk? >> he's a bible scholar, new testament scholar who is founder and leader of a group called jesus seminar. a group of scholars for the last 15 years have been exploring the historical jesus. >> yeah, does he have very much standing in the academic community paula fredriksen interhe represents the school of representation. >> she's also a diplomat. well, funk is saying some pretty vacanting things. and it appears as though he is off the charts, does it not? he's organized a semiannual seminar that you speak of. and his forum debunks the sayings from the cross, the virgin birth, the resurrection, jesus' miracles and he sees jesus as a sort of jewish socrates, almost a lenny bruce character, is that right. >> that's right. >> you find no evidence in any of your scholarship, by the way, that jesus was a revolutionary, correct? interi find counterevidence. >> cou
, they belong to religions and it will guarantee the security needs and interest of if state of israel and the palestinians. but this is a dramatic change from what barack was doing and it certainly is different from any other idea that came up through the years so i can say that barak under the influence of president clinton did a great deal but the in the end they messed it up primarily because of the reluctance of yasser arafat to make any agreement. i never believed arafat will make any agreement because he was a terrorist. there is a big difference between him and abbas. mahmoud abbas, while he was with yasser arafat said officially and publicly and officially that he was against terror when arafat was conducting terror against the state of israel. so i think abbas was the best possible partner for a peace agreement. he and p.m. fayyad were doing many dramatic changes in the way that the administration of the palestinians is handled in the west bank which are very positive much beyond what most people anticipated that they could do. so they have to get credit and i think they are
religion you make of the situation in egypt and the dangers it could turn into an islamist state? >> the bottom line in egypt is it's bad for the egyptian in their political future. probably not as bad for the long-term interests of the united states. anytime a leader like morsi puts himself above the judiciary, that's not a good sign to democracy. anytime you put that language in there, it's not good for their democracy. it's troubling not only for egypt but for the long-term events in syria where things are more polarised because of the violence there and the possibility of an islamist state there. but the more encouraging news is the brotherhood has shown they can behave a little more. >> the brotherhood of which morsi was a member of. >> and when he first came in they called to ban alcohol but they didn't because of tourist dollars. and to segregate beaches and they didn't do it bus they were concerned about the economic realities. they need western aid. and the the gaza conflict. they behaved responsibly and tried to bring things to a conclusion. there is evidence that while
on the street say it doesn't provide enough guarantees for women's rights or minority religions. what do you make of the situation, in egypt and the dangers that it could turn into an islamic state. >> the bottom line in egypt, it is bad for egyptians and their political future, and perhaps not quite as bad for the long term national security interests of the united states, any time a leader of a country like morsi puts himself above the judiciary it is not a good sign for democracy and when you run through a constitution with language that could lead to islamist interpretation, that is not good for their democracy. and it is particularly troubling, not only for egypt, but, for the long term course of events in syria, and things are extraordinarily polarized and a possibility of an islamist state there. but the more encouraging news, the brotherhood has shown they can -- >> the muslim brotherhood of which he was a member. >> there were calls to ban alcohol and they didn't do it, why? because they cared about tourist dollars and, changing women wear on the beaches and they were concerned abou
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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